First things first: if you’re looking for books, you can find the MIEL shop here.

MIEL was established in 2011 to promote and publish difficult, innovative, intelligent, and deeply felt writing and visual art. The press’s initial focus on supporting and promoting the work of women writers has broadened, and MIEL’s remit is now to publish difficult, innovative, intelligent, and deeply felt writing and artwork, with a focus on work made by women, people of color, and LGBTQ people.

To state it plain: writers of color, queer writers, trans writers, women writers, writers with disabilities are all especially encouraged to send work.

MIEL continues to exist because of subscriptions and book sales. You can support the press by purchasing books in the shop. You can also sign up for the MIELand Dickinson House newsletters.

I (see below for more about who this ‘I’ is) read manuscript submissions in June via Submittable. I read work for the biannual literary magazine 111O much of the year. You can buy a copy of 111O right here.

In fall 2014, I opened Dickinson House, a residency center for artists and writers in rural East Flanders, Belgium. Dickinson House will offer fellowships (fee-free residencies) each year; applications for 2016 open on November 1, 2015. Please see the Dickinson House site for more details.

 * * *

Some frequently asked questions:

How do you pronounce the press’s name?

I say ‘mee-ehl’, the French word for honey. But lots of you say ‘meel’, especially Flemish people, who wonder why I’ve given the press a little boy’s nickname.

How do you say the journal’s name?

Again, what I say and what everyone else might differ. I say ‘one one one oh’. But I’ve heard ‘eleven ten’, ‘one thousand one hundred and ten’, ‘eleven hundred ten’, ‘one one one zero’, and other variations. I like my pronunciation because—picky small thing—the final character in the title is, typographically, not a zero (0) but an O. 111OBut I don’t really mind how other people say it. The more, the merrier.

How often does the journal come out?

About every six months, or roughly fall and spring. I aim for October and April, but production times can vary. As of this writing (August 2015), I am still working on issue eight. I will stop production of the journal after issue ten (or possibly eleven), because with such a binary title that seems only right. All that to say: if you want your work in 111O, send it soon.

Why don’t you read work all year round?

Because it takes a lot of time and there are too many of you and too few of me. Not to mention that I have to bind books sometime.

Where are you located?

In Belgium.

Are you hiring? Do you work with interns?

I’m not, and it’s unlikely I’ll be able to hire anyone in the foreseeable future (I also don’t draw a salary). I don’t work with interns because there’s just not the infrastructure to support a learning experience for you (not to mention to provide things like a stipend, housing, and meals). If you have a burning desire to work for free or very little, though, please get in touch.

What kind of books do you publish? Will you publish my work?

The best way to see what kinds of books MIEL publishes is to buy a few. The microseries is designed to offer a taste of writers I like at an affordable price, if your budget is tight.

MIEL might publish your work, if I love it and if it fits the list and if I think the sales would cover printing/ production costs. You can send it to me in June. Read about that here.

How do I request a review copy?

Email miel.books at gmail.

Who are you, anyway?

Designer/creative director/editor Éireann Lorsung received her MFA from the University of Minnesota in 2006 and her PhD from the University of Nottingham in 2013. A writer herself, her influences range across visual art, contemporary writing, and theory. Her first book, Music For Landing Planes By, came out from Milkweed Editions in 2007 and was followed by Her book in 2013. A third collection is forthcoming in 2018, also from Milkweed.